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Mar 16
JPY Fundamental
Retal Sales Japan down 1.3 Percent in may
Tuesday, 28 June 2011 05:32

Retail sales in Japan plunged in May. Data released by the Ministry of economy, trade and industry of Japan today (28/6) showed overall retail sales were down 1.3 percent compared to last year.

A decrease in sales of automotive 24,4 per cent was the biggest contributor to the overall decline in retail sales.

The data also show the details of the sale of large-scale retailers fell 2.4 percent compared to last year.

 
Japanese Tertiary Industry Activity Index Rises 2.6% in April
Friday, 10 June 2011 05:36

Japan's tertiary industry activity index rose in April. Data released by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) said today (10 / 6) shows the tertiary industry activity index rose 2.6 percent in line with Japan's economic recovery after the disaster of earthquake and tsunami in March.

The actual number of data lower than expected by economists who had predicted an increase of 2.7 per cent following a 6.0 percent decline in March.

 
BoJ: May CGPI -0.1% m/m, 2.6% y/y
Friday, 10 June 2011 05:29

June/10 - The data which measures prices of goods purchased Japanese companies (CGPI / Corporate Goods Prices Index) showed a decrease of 0.1 percent to 105.5 in May. The actual figures to data released by the Bank of Japan (BoJ) has missed the expectations of economists who predict an increase by 0.2 percent following a 0.9 percent increase the previous month.

 
Consumer Confidence Levels and Improved Household Japan in May
Thursday, 09 June 2011 07:45

June/09 - Japanese consumer confidence improved in May. The result of the Japanese government survey showed consumer sentiment indicator rose to 34.2 from 33.1 earlier in April. Data the actual number is lower than expected by economists.

 
Japanese Housing Starts Rise 0.3 Percent In April
Tuesday, 31 May 2011 06:53

May/31 - Japan's Housing Starts data, unexpectedly, showed an increase of 0.3 percent in April compared to last year. In previous March, this data is recorded down 2.4 percent. Economists expect the data before it will show a decline of about 3 percent.

The number of dwelling that was built during the period of 12 months to April, as many as 798,000, down from 807,000 in March previous. Detailed data also indicated that construction orders received by 50 major contractors increased by 31.4 percent compared to last year, following a decline of 11 percent in March.

Housing Starts data is data that count the number of new privately owned residential construction work begins within a certain period.

 
G7 Meeting Analysis - 18/March
Written by Praful Patat   
Friday, 18 March 2011 05:54

G7 Meetings:
At the worst possible moment for Japan's economy, the yen has surged to all-time highs against the US dollar and other currencies. Finance ministers of the G7 group of leading economies discussed yesterday that how they might ease the situation, with market expectations. The French Finance Minister Christine Lagarde, who organised the discussions, said the aim was to "see how we can take part in their debt issues and how we can react on a financial level".
The yen traded to 76.25 against the dollar during trading yesterday. Some of the funds held by Japanese households and businesses abroad in dollar, euro, sterling and other currencies now being sold and converted to yen to pay for reconstruction and repair work at home. Traders also said that speculation in advance of such moves had also driven the Japanese currency higher. An unwinding down of the yen "carry trade", where Japanese currency is borrowed at ultra-low interest rates and invested in higher-yielding Australian and New Zealand dollar funds has also contributed. The Bank of Japan yesterday morning offered emergency funds for a fourth consecutive day, offering ¥5 trillion to the banks, and a further ¥1trillion in the afternoon. On Monday the bank pumped ¥7trillion into the system. For all operations taking into account, the bank of Japan has offered a total of ¥55.6trillion in short-term funds in the past three days, helping to allay fears of a "credit crunch" and financial crisis to add to the natural and nuclear disasters. So holdings denominated in dollars and pounds and euros and rand are being repatriated. That means buying yen. And nobody is selling, so the price goes up.

At the worst possible moment for Japan's economy, the yen has surged to all-time highs against the US dollar and other currencies. Finance ministers of the G7 group of leading economies discussed yesterday that how they might ease the situation, with market expectations. The French Finance Minister Christine Lagarde, who organised the discussions, said the aim was to "see how we can take part in their debt issues and how we can react on a financial level".